Newsletter 4/2017

Eva Štichová – her life story

(June 27, 1927 – November 5, 2017)

Eva with her classmates from a Karlín school (second right), first half of the 20th century, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

Eva with her classmates from a Karlín school (second right), first half of the 20th century, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

Eva was born in 1927 in Nový Bohumín as Eva Beldová. At the age of two she moved with her parents to Prague, while the family still maintained close ties with their relatives in the Těšín district and Silesia. During her vacations Eva would often come back to stay with her granny.
Eva´s parents hailed from an area known for its profoundly religious Jewish community, which was also reflected in the Belda family life. In Prague they maintained a kosher household, the family used to go to a synagogue for major holidays. Her father worked in the Bromografia company publishing art books and photographs. Eva attended a Czech school, her friends being Czech children without any regard for their religious conviction. However, later on she had to leave the school because of her Jewish origin and since then she befriended mostly Jewish youngsters who shared a similar fate with her. In 1941 she began working in a factory manufacturing condensers. It was there that she first came into contact with the underground resistance movement in which she became involved.

Eva in the 1930s, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

Eva in the 1930s, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

She received an order to a transport to the Terezín Ghetto in the fall of 1942. She left for Terezín alone even though her father and the rest of the family volunteered to join the transport to keep them all together.
In the Ghetto Eva lived in the girls´ home L 410, working in a vegetable garden, locally known as ”Crete“. Here, too, she was engaged in the underground work, being in touch with people who greatly influenced her future opinions. These were, for instance, Irena Krausová, Truda Sekaninová, František Grauss and many others.
Eva´s parents and her elder sister Helga were deported to Terezín in early March 1943. But already in the fall of 1943 her parents were put on the list for a transport to the East. They perished in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp while Eva, at that time, had not the faintest idea of their fate.
In the summer of 1944 Eva worked for some three months as an assistant to Friedl Dicker-Brandejs in her art classes. Eva would prepare teaching aids or write headings for children´s drawings. Watching Friedl teach her children proved to be an unforgettable experience for Eva.

Eva came to Terezín in a transport codenamed Bf under the number 11, Terezin Memorial, APT 7394.

Eva came to Terezín in a transport codenamed Bf under the number 11, Terezin Memorial, APT 7394.

Later on Eva was also assigned to a transport to the East, her summons came in the fall of 1944. She left the Terezín Ghetto in a transport designated En on October 4, 1944. Eva always recollected her journey in this transport with a very heavy heart since she had travelled with adults but also with some 500 children, most of them orphans. Eva was very lucky to pass the selection in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp and she was soon sent to work in Freiberg. She was in a factory manufacturing wings for jet fighters. With the approaching battlefront the Nazis tried to transfer Eva and her fellow inmates to Flossenbürg. But that camp had already been liberated by the US Army before Eva´s transport from Freiberg could get there. A long and stressful journey, which eventually ended in the Mauthausen concentration camp, awaited the women prisoners, all of them in a sorry state. Eventually, Eva lived to see the camp´s liberation by the Americans on May 5, 1945.
Eva was seriously ill during the first days of peace. Fortunately for her, she was treated by a Czech inmate – surgeon professor Podlaha who operated on her, thus saving her life. Eva returned to Prague on May 19, 1945 but she did not find any member of her family. Later on, one of her cousins and her sister Helga came back. However, Eva refused to return to her parental home and then managed to get small a bedsit. Trying to make up for the lost time she enrolled in the Women´s Teacher Training Institute in Prague. This school predetermined her professional career until the end of her working life.

Eva Štichová, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

Eva Štichová, Eva Štichová´s private archive.

For Eva Mauthausen did not spell only the end of her hardships experienced at the end of the war; the place also brought into her life a ray of hope and eventually enough strength to live on. While in the camp she met another man, aksi a prisoner, Dr. Zdeněk Štich whom she married later in 1945. Her husband´s family cordially received then 18-year Eva who started her ”normal“ life. Eva´s sister also got married and left for the United States. Eva applied herself to bringing up her two children and spent many happy years side by side her beloved husband. In addition to her family, she derived a lot of pleasure from teaching her pupils, a career that spanned nearly three decades.
After the foundation of the Terezín Initiative Eva Štichová became involved in the work of this association. She co-authored a reader called Cesta – cíl neznámý (Journey – Destination Unknown, Academia Prague 1995) and she made very good use of her teaching experience also in the past few decades during countless debates with pupils and students at schools, in the Terezín Memorial and elsewhere.
Eva Štichová´s enormous strength lay in her indomitable life optimism and her laughter which she shared during meetings with her audiences – pupils, students and adults alike. This image of her shall always stay imprinted in our memories.

Se

Terezín Memorial´s Web Presentation in a New Garb

Homepage of the Terezín Memorial´s new website.

Homepage of the Terezín Memorial´s new website.

Since September 2017 people interested in what is happening in the Terezín Memorial or planning the visit of the place may do so thanks to its new website presentation.
The new web pages feature a modern look with a distinctive homepage. The highlight of the opening page are the pictures of the various former repressive facilities administered by the Terezín Memorial. Each photograph also carries a short quote – either an entry from a period diary or a postwar recollection of a former inmate. Visitors to the website can also click on the name of the author of the recollection and eventually read his or her story (if we happen to be familiar with it). These quotes constitute a kind of tribute to the former inmates as well as a reminder saying that “large history“ hides millions of human stories that often address us in a more comprehensible way than history textbooks.
The homepage also set itself the task to point out to the visitors the most interesting events the Memorial has to offer (visiting its individual objects, online search engines for looking up names of former inmates, catalogs of art collections, educational projects, online publications, calendars of events, information on the Terezín Memorial´s exhibitions etc.) and to provide a fast and simple route to their required content. The structure of the website remains unchanged but your navigation should be much simpler and faster, with a well-arranged menu as an efficient aid.
We sincerely believe that online visitors will like our new website and we will be happy to receive your comments and further ideas. Please, send them to our Facebook page or to our e-mail address: press@pamatnik-terezin.cz.

Kl

Exhibition: New Arrivals to the Terezín Memorial´s Collection from the Years 2010 – 2016

A set of surgical instruments from the Police Prison in the Small Fortress, probably the property of a surgeon-inmate, Terezin Memorial, PT 14139.

A set of surgical instruments from the Police Prison in the Small Fortress, probably the property of a surgeon-inmate, Terezin Memorial, PT 14139.

In the second half of 2017 the Terezín Memorial staged an exhibition offering its visitors a very interesting insight into the Memorial´s collection – this time a total of 66 most interesting new arrivals from the period 2010 – 2016 went on display from the total amount of 513.
The exhibits featured worthwhile works of art and historically valuable collection items from the wartime and postwar eras. Most of the wartime exhibits came from the Terezín Ghetto. An exception to the rule was a painting depicting a book-binding workshop in the Litoměřce prison. On the other hand, artworks from the postwar period were quite diversified in their subject matter. On display from the collection of 3D exhibits were objects previously owned by people imprisoned in the concentration camps (Mauthausen, Ravensbrück and Buchenwald), in prisons (Police Prison in Terezín´s Small Fortress, in Mladá Boleslav), and in the Bernau penitentiary, two exhibits also came from the Terezín Ghetto.

Children´s shoes worn in the Terezín Ghetto by Petr Dadák (born in 1942). He was deported to Terezín from Ostrava in March 1945 in a transport AE 6. He stayed in Terezín with his mother until the ghetto´s liberation, Terezin Memorial, PT 14298.

Children´s shoes worn in the Terezín Ghetto by Petr Dadák (born in 1942). He was deported to Terezín from Ostrava in March 1945 in a transport AE 6. He stayed in Terezín with his mother until the ghetto´s liberation, Terezin Memorial, PT 14298.

The acquisition policy of the Terezín Memorial’s Department of Collections is focused primarily on works of art and objects made in the Jewish Ghetto in Terezín and in the Police Prison in the Small Fortress in Terezín. These are mainly items used by inmates as well as their prison guards or objects that formed part of the Ghetto buildings. However, the whole gamut of items in the Terezín Memorial´s collection is much larger, both in historical and thematic terms. In addition to the above-mentioned thematic fields, the collection also comprises works of art created during the 1920s and 30s in response to the advance of fascism and Nazism, as well as works by artists pointing a cautionary finger at violence and the danger of war in today´s world. The 3D objects kept in the Memorial´s collection are not solely connected with Terezín, some of them illustrate the life of inmates in many other concentration camps, prisons and penitentiaries.
Up to this day, the Terezín Memorial still succeeds in acquiring works of art and 3D objects from the estates of former prisoners. New arrivals mostly come from the children and grandchildren of those who had passed through the repressive facilities during Nazi persecution. Newly acquired items are restored, conserved and then displayed at exhibitions or are loaned to other museums for their own displays.

Se

Seminars for Teachers – Fall 2017

Workshop during a seminar in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, led by Miroslav Obstarczyk, photo: Helena Palová.

Workshop during a seminar in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, led by Miroslav Obstarczyk, photo: Helena Palová.

A third-tier teacher-training seminar, organized since 2002 in conjunction with the Czech Republic´s Ministry of Education, Youth and Physical, the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and the Terezín Memorial, was held in the State Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau in Poland between October 5 and 8, 2017. An intensive two-day program, complete with extended fact-finding visits to the Auschwitz I. and Auschwitz II – Birkenau camps, was prepared for its participants, teachers who have already passed two levels of the educational seminars focused on teaching about the Holocaust in the Czech Republic. The program also included a presentation of the International Center for Education about Auschwitz and the Holocaust and lectures devoted to the subject of the SS in the Auschwitz camp and extermination of the Sinti and Roma inmates. During the workshops the teachers had an opportunity to view the Museum´s archives and collections. The attendees described as particularly useful especially the chance to meet their colleagues during such educational projects.
One week later, between October 12 and 15, 2017, the Terezín Memorial hosted a follow-up seminar for Czech and Polish schoolteachers. Its rich program prepared for both the Czech and Polish groups differed in some points, reflecting their general knowledge of the topic. While the Polish teachers opened their program with a lecture on the history of Terezín´s repressive facilities, followed by a visit to the former Terezín Ghetto, their Czech counterparts heard a lecture on health care in the Ghetto after which they went on a special visit to the places in Terezín that are not usually accessible to visitors. Whole group then visited the depository of the Department of Collections of the Terezín Memorial and heard a lecture on the subject of religious life in the Ghetto and the psychological aspects of the Holocaust. One of the highlights of the program was a meeting with Mrs. Dagmar Lieblová, a former Ghetto inmate. The seminar also offered an insight into the history of the Terezín Police Prison in the Small Fortress. Its participants singled out as highly beneficial the opportunity for Czech and Polish schoolteachers to meet and exchange experience gained during their own teaching of this difficult subject.

Pa+Se

Unveiling Shoa Monument in Jindřichův Hradec

    10. Shoa Monument in Jindřichův Hradec, photo: Marta Léblová.

10. Shoa Monument in Jindřichův Hradec, photo: Marta Léblová.

A monument commemorating the victims of racial persecution during the years 1939–1945 was unveiled at a ceremony in the city´s Zaskostelecký Square on Sunday, May 21, 2017. The author of the monument, academic sculptor Vladimír Krninský, created his work to mark the 75th anniversary of the transport of Jews from Jindřichův Hradec to Terezín.
The ceremony in the smallish square brought together some 100 people – members of the Zikaron Union, the organizer of the event, officials of the City of Jindřichův Hradec as the main sponsor of the project, the general public and, last but not least, family members and relatives who expressed their gratitude and emotions, while appreciating that the names of their next of kin shall not be forgotten. The guests included 91-year František Fantl, a Holocaust survivor, who had been in that transport and who still has family ties in the city. We are positive that the date May 22, 1942 will find its place among the more joyous anniversaries marked in May and that the monument itself will serve as a venue for mutual meetings.

Mgr. Marta Leblová, Zikaron z.s.

Literární a výtvarná soutěž Památníku Terezín
skola_banner

Newsletter Archive

Projects of Czech schools

Videotheke

Videotéka

Newsletter

Editorial board: Naďa Seifertová, Jiří Kleker
Contact Us: newsletter@pamatnik-terezin.cz

Terezín Memorial on Facebook